Next-generation encrypted smartphone receives EU approval

January 27, 2014 // By Jean-Pierre Joosting
A smartphone app for secure voice communication and text messaging, Sectra Panthon 3, has been granted EU approval for the protection of EU classified information at the EU RESTRICTED level.

This enables EU authorities and officials to securely communicate sensitive information over ordinary mobile networks without fear of interception. Sectra Panthon is also available as a service, not requiring any infrastructure investments nor managing of encryption keys.

“The recent eavesdropping disclosures once again show the need for more secure communication systems. Unprotected telephone calls and messages entail a security threat for individuals, organizations and nations,” says Michael Bertilsson, President of Sectra’s Secure Communications business area.

With Sectra Panthon, users can safely share sensitive information through encrypted voice- and text conversations. Hardware-based key protection ensures the very high level of security. Moreover, Sectra Panthon users can continue to enjoy the smartphone services they have grown to depend on, and the user organization has approved – such as regular unprotected phone calls, e-mails, photography, web browsing and social networks.

Sectra Panthon is available as a service for time-efficient deployment and cost-efficient use. All the required service items are included — from the smartphone to key and certificate management, set-up and administration of the Panthon system.

Sectra Panthon 3 functions on all major wireless networks including 2G, 2.5G and 3G and Wi-Fi. A PIN code is all that is needed to activate the added protection.

The Sectra Panthon app is designed to support the SCIP-protocol, which means that it will be possible to use for communication with other secure devices, such as the Sectra Tiger system which is approved to the even stricter SECRET level.

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