Microwave heating could impact electronics manufacture

June 11, 2014 // By Jean-Pierre Joosting
Engineers at Oregon State University have successfully shown that a continuous flow reactor can produce high-quality nanoparticles by using microwave-assisted heating – essentially the same forces that heat up leftover food with such efficiency.

Instead of warming up yesterday's pizza, however, this concept may provide a technological revolution.

It could change everything from the production of cell phones and televisions to counterfeit-proof money, improved solar energy systems or quick identification of troops in combat.

The findings, recently published in Materials Letters, are essentially a "proof of concept" that a new type of nanoparticle production system should actually work at a commercial level.

"This might be the big step that takes continuous flow reactors to large-scale manufacturing," said Greg Herman, an associate professor and chemical engineer in the OSU College of Engineering. "We're all pretty excited about the opportunities that this new technology will enable."

This graphic outlines the basic functions of a "continuous flow" reactor that could be used to produce a variety of high quality nanoparticles, using microwave heating. Graphic courtesy of Oregon State University.