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Terahertz scanner detects illicit drugs and explosives in letters

May 26, 2014 | Jean-Pierre Joosting | 222905000
Terahertz scanner detects illicit drugs and explosives in letters Until now there was no safe and simple way of reliably detecting the presence of explosives or drugs in letters and small packets. This enables bomb or poison (anthrax) scares to be very disruptive and expensive to governments. A terahertz scanner developed by researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Physical Measurement Techniques IPM in Kaiserslautern in collaboration with Hübner GmbH & Co. KG in Kassel could put an end to this problem.
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Their T-COGNITION system is capable of detecting and identifying the hidden content of suspicious packages or envelopes without having to open them. One of this year's Joseph von Fraunhofer prizes was awarded to Prof. Dr. René Beigang of Fraunhofer IPM and Dipl.-Ing. Thorsten Sprenger, Head of Public Security and Photonics at Hübner, for their work on the terahertz scanner for the secure identification of hazardous materials and illicit drugs in postal consignments.

Professor René Beigang explains: "The terahertz range lies midway between microwave and infrared in the electromagnetic spectrum, and thus combines the advantages of both." Like microwaves, these low-energy frequencies can easily penetrate paper, wood, lightweight fabrics, plastics, and ceramics. Moreover, terahertz waves generate characteristic spectra depending on the type of material they travel through, which can be analyzed quickly using intelligent software. A further significant advantage is that terahertz waves are non-ionizing and therefore safe to use in an unprotected environment, unlike X-rays. This makes the technology an interesting option for use in mail scanners.

Terahertz technology is still in its infancy, and until now it has found relatively few applications. The department of Material Characterization and Testing at the University of Kaiserslautern, sponsored jointly by Fraunhofer IPM and the Land of Rheinland-Pfalz, hopes to change this situation. "Our goal is to scale up terahertz technology and extend its range of use to include security applications," says Beigang. The engineers at Hübner were among the first to recognize the potential of the Fraunhofer researchers' work. The company's traditional line of business is manufacturing key components for the transportation industry (e.g. rail vehicles, buses, airport technology, automotive). A new division for public security was added in 2006, when the company first started to look for cooperation partners. The mail scanner project was launched four years later, based on previous joint development projects. In the meantime, the company has brought its T-COGNITION solution onto the market.

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